Roof My Rafters!

I am at the beginning stages of design with several families who are having to make lots of decisions including what roofing products they will use.
One has already chosen to go with a standing seam metal roof for their low-country style home which is a perfect solution. I don’t know what  the other will choose but I wanted to talk with you a little today about my favorite roof- slate.
When The Writer and I bought our very first home – an adorable little cottage in one of the historic old neighborhoods of our city- it had a slate roof and a love affair was born. The house was built in 1920 and, because it was slate, this was the original roof.
I know what you are thinking. “WHO can afford to use a slate roof today!”  Obviously you have to weigh the cost but if you are building a new house and if it is, as the McAlpine group would say, an inheritable house and you factor in the fact that you will NEVER have to replace that roof then it becomes a little easier to swallow.
Rachel Grace from Houzz just published a well documented piece on roofs and I am borrowing some of their pictures and info rather than reinvent the wheel. How beautiful, romantic, charming is that roof. Imagine the same house with asphalt shingles… I would rather not, thank you.

Slate quarried for roofing is a dense, sound rock that’s exceptionally tough and substantial.

Cost: 
Most slate roofs are expensive, running between $15 and $30 per square foot installed. This figure is at least five times more than conventional roofing materials. However, a slate roof can last 150 years or more — at least five times longer than a conventional roof.
 Slate is available in a variety of sizes, natural colors and thicknesses, allowing for architectural customization. Some homeowners choose to create a pattern with slate roof tiles by mixing slates of different earthy colors. The color of a particular slate has to do with the quarry it hails from. Hues range from dark gray to green to purple.Slate roofing is built to withstand even the worst weather, making it an excellent roofing choice for all regions across the U.S., even those that experience a wide variety of weather patterns. Large flying debris picked up by tornado- and hurricane-force winds is all that is known to possibly damage a high-quality slate roof.Slate is also a fireproof material. While the wood decking installed under slate is obviously not fireproof, fires that affect entire neighborhoods are consistently transferred from roof to roof, and homes with slate roofs are typically spared.
 Slate often outlasts buildings themselves and can be recycled. Today many slate roofs are constructed with reclaimed slate. Besides the recycling benefits, reclaimed slate is often less expensive than new slate.A slate roof’s longevity also is an environmental plus, especially because slate rarely adds toconstruction and demolition debris like conventional roofs do. Plus, slate is a 100 percent natural material. Slate often outlasts buildings themselves and can be recycled. Today many slate roofs are constructed with reclaimed slate. Besides the recycling benefits, reclaimed slate is often less expensive than new slate.A slate roof’s longevity also is an environmental plus, especially because slate rarely adds to construction and demolition debris like conventional roofs do. Plus, slate is a 100 percent natural material.
Here are some of my personal favorites:
Cindy Barganier Interiors
Slate with terra cotta chimney pots… ummm… yes!
Cindy Barganier Interiors
A residence in Birmingham, Alabama
McAlpineTankersley

McAlpineTankersley

 

Have I convinced you ?  Then please call  me so that I can be a part of birthing a new slate baby. You can name it. 🙂

 

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It’s A Wash.

I am fascinated by all of the unique tubs that are being used. Here are some of  the more unusual.

outdoor tub

imgfav.com

ellergy: BATHTUBS THAT'S BEYOND BEAUTIFUL: 20 Unique bath tubs

ellergy: BATHTUBS THAT'S BEYOND BEAUTIFUL: 20 Unique bath tubs

Unique bath tubs

bagnosasso-unique-tubs-diamond-1

ahhh…. no

ellergy: BATHTUBS THAT'S BEYOND BEAUTIFUL: 20 Unique bath tubs

Great tub

My favorite one, a hollowed out log on a stone porch, I can’t find. Now where did I put that picture? hmmm ( The Writer is rolling his eyes).

If you would like to say, “That was fun!” at the end of your project contact me at

www.cindybarganier.com.

 

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Another Historic Treasure

Just days after I posted about the historic Gay House (here) a friend started talking about another amazing old house in Montgomery that hubby and I actually looked at a lifetime ago, the Winter House.

The story goes that there is a tunnel that was used to escape Wilson’s raiders that leads from the basement to the river.

 The old grainy photo is from some ancient files that I dug up but take some time to examine this glorious structure. Notice the unusual balustrade around the porch and the trim detail between the columns. It looks like a key hole. See it? I love that charming little window over the front door. Steve Mouzon you need to jump in here with some more interesting info on this house.

 And speaking of front doors does it get any better than this? I want them.

 I know. It makes me cry also. Check out those corbels. How many must there be in all????? And by the way this is how shutters are SUPPOSED to be used. Have you ever seen the vinyl version that some builder stuck on a building BACKWARDS!  Please.

Love, love, love those fish scale shingles and that awesome window.

Southern Accents you might be headed back to town.

If you want to say, That was fun!” at the end of your project contact me at

www.cindybarganier.com.

 

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Tile

There are so many beautiful options on the market for tile today that you could literally spend weeks trying to decide what to use. Unfortunately some of the options will seriously date your house so you have to think long-term when choosing the hard surfaces for a home. I tend to stay pretty classic but that doesn’t mean you have to be boring.

For instance the tile used for this master bath is a very sophisticated (some might even say sexy) product called textile that I found at Jenkins Brick.

It looks like the walls are covered with linen and comes in a nice range of colors. We used the 12 x 24 size with a staggered joint installation.

We wanted a very clean contemporary look so we kept the joints as small as possible and matched the grout to the “linen” lines as closely as we could (which also means less grout to clean). The tub by Victoria and Albert is a freestanding white work of art. It hasn’t been installed yet and I can’t wait to see it.

There are some tricks of the trade you can use to achieve a great custom look while using very reasonably priced in- stock tiles. For the childrens’ shower we used Antares Platinum (at an average cost of $3.60 sf) in various sizes and directions to accomplish a much more expensive look. The bottom 3/4 of the wall is done in 20″ x 20″ squares run straight. On top of this is a border of 4″ x 4″ tiles that mirror tiles on the floor. The top section is finished with 13″ x 13″ tiles run on the diagonal. The feel is that of tumbled marble without the price tag.

 

Short on space? Have your tile mason make a raised ledge out of your marble or granite. It is just big enough to hold a lovely silver shaving kit or a bar of soap and frees up the real counter. You have to carefully select your faucets though to make sure you have enough room to raise and lower the drain stopper. We didn’t think about adding the ledge until after the fact so we had to swap out the fixtures.

 Tomorrow is your last chance to sign up for the give away. Go here and scroll down to “Give Away!”  to find the rules on how to be entered in the drawing. If you are already registered but would like to better your chances get a friend to subscribe to the this blog; shoot me an email  (cindybarg@knology.net) telling me that they are your contact and your name goes in TWO MORE TIMES!

If you want to say, “That was fun!” at the end of your project contact me at www.cindybarganier.com.

 

 

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